"High-Testosterone Beef--the food of real men"

Question 1: What makes higher testosterone in the meat better? Does the evidence support that eating more testosterone results in higher testosterone in the body?
Answer 1: It is well documented that men today have significantly lower testosterone levels than in the past.  See "A population-level decline in serum testosterone levels in American men.", Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 92:196-202 (Travison, Araujo, O'Donnell, Kupelian, McKinlay).  A study by Fritsche and Steinhart https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9655582 shows bull meat has a median of 34 times more testosterone and more than twice as much epitestosterone than steer meat.  Timothy Ferriss's book The Four Hour Body shows how eating beef and Brazil nuts (high in selenium) increases testosterone.  Standard Process's book "1 Degree of Change" (free PDF) shows grass-fed beef has healthier ratios of Omega-6 to Omega-3 than grainfed cows (2:1 to 4:1 for the former versus 18:1 for the latter).  Dr. Mercola shows that consuming zinc and D3 increases testosterone.  My cattle have free choice access to zinc, selenium, and D3.  So, if eating beef, zinc, selenium, and D3 increases testosterone, then it would seem a reasonable conclusion that eating beef from bulls, with significantly higher levels of testosterone than steers, which bulls have had free access to zinc, selenium, and D3, would increase one's testosterone levels.  However, I don't have a specific double-blind study to cite comparing human testosterone levels in response to a diet of bull versus steer beef.  If anyone becomes aware of one, please let me know.  I haven't made a thorough search, by the way, nor am I a large corporate operation ready to fund such a study.
Higher testosterone in the meat tends to raise the pH increasing the chance of "dark cutters" if the animal is stressed or draws upon its glycogen levels prior to slaughter.  Postmortem glycolysis gives off lactic acid, but if the animal is stressed prior to slaughter and uses its glycogen reserves, there will be less lactic acid available from postmortem glycolysis to lower the pH, which results in bright red meat. If the pH gets above 6.0, will tend to make the meat darker. (http://meat.tamu.edu/2013/01/22/dark-cutting-beef/)  But this affects marketability, not taste--people tend to want to buy bright red steaks.  So, while higher testosterone in the meat can be bad, solely for the seller because the meat might not turn out bright red, it can be better if it raises the testosterone levels of the one eating it.  I believe it does for the aforementioned reasons, though I don't have a study with data to cite proving this.

Question 2: What breed of cattle do you raise?
Answer 2: I currently have hereford cows (red and white) and angus cows (black) with an angus bull and a brangus bull. I am planning to attend embryo transplant school in the summer to introduce wagyu bloodlines into the herd for enhanced marbling in the steaks.

Question 3: Do you do tours?
Answer 3: Yes, provided you are a private individual, not an agent, informant, or employee for a competitor, public entity, corporation, or agency, then I would be glad to show you and any of your friends my private operation and try to answer any questions, preferably on the weekend. The tour ends with a free sample of beef. I would welcome your visit.

Question 4: How do I buy the beef?
Answer 4: Please use the contact form or send a text (or leave a voicemail) to let me know you're interested, and then I can call you back and make arrangements to suit your needs. I have limited availability 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. during the week, but I will return your voicemail or text message. The best way, if you want a half-beef or quarter-beef, is to provide a deposit for your order ($300 for quarter beef, $500 for half beef, and $900 for whole beef). I will then deliver the live animal on a Sunday to the butcher. Monday morning the butcher will call to provide the carcass weight, and then the balance becomes due. Once you have paid the full price based on the hanging carcass weight, you can call the butcher directly and provide instructions for how you want your meat cut. The customer pays for all the processing costs, which are currently between $0.95 and $1.15 per pound, depending on whether you want freezer paper or vacuum shrink wrapped. The butcher will hang the carcass for up to two weeks free for tenderizing. For customers who want less than ¼ beef, I can make flexible arrangements to pair you up with others who also want smaller quantities.  Payment is accepted in cash, check, bitcoin, or gold/silver coin.  It is extremely easy to own bitcoin.  Go to WeUseCoins.com to learn how. 

Question 5: What have others said about the beef?
Answer 5: The following are comments and feedback from those to whom I have provided samples:


A doctor and nutritionist, 5/9/17: “The ground beef was WONDERFUL. It was the first time in my LIFE that I didn't feel like I had a rock in my stomach through the following day!  LOVE the flavor and how my body reacted.  I don't eat steak because I usually feel worse eating that than red meat, so I had my husband and my parents try the steak. The all said it was really tough, but had great flavor. (We just had it 2 nights ago.) My dad thought that part of the toughness was the fact that it's steer meat and the way it was cut. We were all impressed with how much information was on the nutritional card you sent. I am DEFINITELY planning on ordering more ground beef from you soon....and steaks, etc. in the future.”
K.P., May 2017: 'The meat was a little tough, but the taste was good. On a scale of 0 to 10, I'd rate the taste around a 7.'

B.G., September 2017:  "...the steaks I wrapped in tin foil with peppers & onions and put on the grill, both were fantastic.  Because I cooked the steaks low & slow they were very tender."



Harriss High Test Bull Beef Farm